Gorham OHRV Rules and Regulations

GORHAM OHRV TRAIL INFORMATION
Presidential OHRV Club

GORHAM HAS A ZERO TOLERANCE RULE
Obey the rules and laws or you will be ticketed.

Must have a valid New Hampshire OHRV registration which can be purchased at:
Absolute Power Sports – 461 Main St., Gorham.
The Corner Store – 385 Main St., Gorham.
Jericho Outdoors – 232 Jericho Rd., Berlin.
The Royalty Inn – 130 Main St. Gorham.
The Milan Luncheonette – 717 Milan Rd., Milan.

Trails in Gorham and the Jericho ATV park close a half hour after sunset.
Trails in Gorham and the Jericho ATV park open a half hour before sunrise.
Note that the city of Berlin ATV hours are different than Gorham. Be sure to give ample time to return to Gorham before dark.
Must have a forestry-approved quiet exhaust less than 96db with a spark arrestor in accordance with NH RSA 215-A:12 Zero tolerance.
Working head light and tail light. Light bars must be turn off during the day.
Use hand signals on paved roads only.
Respect our neighbors.
Obey all signs and rules.
No off-trail riding.
Stay in the trails or stay home.
Stay off of and out of the sand pit.
Carry out what you carry in do not litter.
No closed-course competition — dirt bikes or OHRVs.
No loud or modified exhausts.
Make no dust or loud noise when entering or leaving the trail system. Turn down your stereo system.
No speeding. Trail speed limit is 10 mph at the trail entrance/exit and 25 mph unless otherwise posted.
Do not travel in the breakdown lanes; stay in road (30 mph).
Must turn left at the lights at Route 2 and 16 intersection; do not go north past the lights.
Do not go past the trail entrance at the Route 2 parking lot.
AGAIN, PLEASE RESPECT OUR RESIDENTS.

YOUTH OPERATOR REQUIREMENTS
UNDER AGE 12
• While operating on personal property or other public property and trails, must have helmet and eye protection and cannot carry passengers on an ATV or ride along or across any public road.
• While operating on public property or trails (other than personal property): must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times.
• Cannot operate across or on public roads.
• May take an OHRV Safety class but cannot be certified (11 year olds may take class and receive card; becomes valid on 12th birthday). Go to ride.nh.gov for more information.
AGE 12 OR 13
• While operating on own personal property or other public property and trails, must have helmet and eye protection and cannot carry passengers on an ATV.
• Must possess an OHRV Safety Certificate if operating off personal property.
While operating on public property or trails:
• Must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times.
• May cross roads.
• May operate on approved roads but must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times.
AGE 14 OR 15
• While operating on own personal property or other public property and trails, must have helmet and eye protection and cannot carry passengers on an ATV.
• Must possess an OHRV Safety Certificate if operating off personal property.
• While operating on public property or trails: Not required to be accompanied.
• May cross roads.
• May operate on approved roads but must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times.
AGE 16 OR 17
• While operating on own personal property or other public property and trails, must have helmet and eye protection and cannot carry passengers on an ATV.
• Must possess an OHRV Safety Certificate if operating off personal property or must possess a valid motor vehicle driver’s license.
While operating on public property or trails:
• Not required to be accompanied.
• May cross roads.
• If not licensed to drive a motor vehicle, may operate on approved roads but must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times.
AGE 18 OR OLDER
• While operating on personal property or other public property and trails, helmet and eye protection recommended. May carry passengers on an ATV.
• Must possess an OHRV Safety Certificate if off of personal property or must possess a valid motor vehicle driver’s license.
• May cross roads.
• If not licensed to drive a motor vehicle, may operate on approved roads but must be accompanied by a licensed adult over 18 years of age at all times. (Age of accompanying adult subject to change; see ride.nh.gov for updates.)
• Go to www.ride.nh.gov for more information
• Support your local club! Without it these trails would not be possible. Ask for an application or visit www.presidentialOHRVclub.com or check the club out on Facebook.

The trails and roads are opened for us enjoy. It is a privilege and not a right, so please do not jeopardize it for everyone.

Thank you for your cooperation and support.

 

Berlin's OHRV Rules and Regulations

BERLIN — The city just updated its OHRV ordinance to address the issue of unlicensed operators riding on city streets. In the past, the city allowed unlicensed drivers age 12 and over to ride on city streets if accompanied by a licensed driver provided the licensed driver was 21 or older. The council is not required the licensed driver to be at least 25 years old. The person accompanying the unlicensed driver shall be liable for the violation of any provision of this section or rules adopted rules hereunder committed by such unlicensed driver. Below is a condensed version of the city’s OHRV ordinance.

Operation of OHRVs
No person shall operate an OHRV, as defined by NH RSA 215A:1, in or on any street, lane, bridge, alley, sidewalk or other public place in the city except as provided below:
1. In addition to the public trails at Jericho Mountain State Park, the following is an authorized municipal public OHRV trail within the City of Berlin:
a) The city of Berlin’s roadways, within the urban compact, will be open to OHRV riders for the purposes of accessing the designated Connector OHRV Trail, (via the shortest possible route) as well as accessing local businesses and services. Riding on municipal streets for any other purpose is prohibited with the exception of Sec. 13-112 (4).
b) On city streets, OHRV signage and markings, as well as traffic signs and signals which must be obeyed by the OHRV operator.
c) The Berlin OHRV Connector Trail and the city of Berlin’s roadways will be closed to OHRV riders when the Bureau of Trails declares that the snow machine trails are no longer useable. The connector trail will re-open on May 23, or a reopen date set by the State Trails Bureau. Berlin’s roadways will reopen accordingly.
d) OHRV Connector Trail: This authorized municipal trail runs where marked from the Jericho Mountain State Park to Route 110 and follows Route 110 southeasterly as it changes from Jericho Road to Wight Street. The trail continues to follow Wight Street to Hillside Avenue, for a short distance to York Street (determined by how the trail is actually marked and signed) where it continues easterly to Granite Street. The trail then turns onto Mason Street where it follows Mason Street southeasterly to East Mason Street where it continues southeasterly to Hutchins Street where it follows Hutchins Street northeasterly to Success Pond Road where it follows Success Pond Road to the Berlin/Success line. This authorized municipal trail includes the section of East Mason Street from the RR tracks east of Hutchins Street to Hutchins Street.
e) Any person who violates the provisions of this article shall be guilty of a violation, punishable by a fine as follows: All violations are subject to a loss of OHRV operating privileges on City streets, NOT including the OHRV Connector trail.
First offense, $100.00 fine.
Second offense, $250.00 fine.
Third offense, $500.00 fine.
2. OHRV users in the city must abide by all state and city laws when on designated trails on city streets and must abide by all motor vehicle traffic laws. However, all unlicensed operators shall be accompanied by a responsible adult who is 25 years of age or older and is a licensed driver (Pursuant to RSA Chapter 263). The person accompanying the unlicensed driver shall be liable for the violation of any provision of this section or rules adopted rules hereunder committed by such unlicensed driver.
a) OHRV’s must yield to pedestrians at all times.
b) OHRV operators, when operating on the designated trail on city streets, shall ride single file in traffic in the paved travel lane (not gravel or paved shoulders).
c) There will be no OHRV riders on city streets between the hours of 10 p.m. through 6 a.m. unless authorized by the city council during special events.
e) All OHRVs operating on designated trails on city streets must have working head and taillights.

 

It's opening weekend for OHRV riders

By Barbara Tetreault

ANDROSCOGGIN VALLEY — The trails are open, and OHRV enthusiasts are expected to be out in full force enjoying the opening weekend for riding.
Most off-road trails opened for use Tuesday including those at Jericho Mountain State Park and Millsfield.
“Riders are always excited for opening day,” said Bureau of Trails Chief Chris Gamache Tuesday. “Although the entire trail network is not completely open, there is a variety of riding terrain throughout the state.”
Ray Bergeron of the Presidential OHRV Club said the clubs have been working hard getting the trails ready and putting up signage. He said one trail into Jericho Park is extremely wet and will not be open for the weekend. But the rest of the network is expected to be open.
His club and others are urging riders to ride responsibly, exhibit good trail manners, and be respectful of property owners and other riders. Regulating noise is a major focus this year.
“This ATV riding is a privilege that can be revoked,” Bergeron said.
Paula Kinney, executive director of the Androscoggin Valley Chamber of Commerce, said her organization is ready to kick off a summer of fun starting this weekend with the Redneck ATV Poker Run. Also on tap in the coming months are the Jericho ATV Festival, Wingzilla, RiverFire, and the region will again host the Polaris’ Camp RZR festival.
This Saturday, registration opens at 9 a.m. for the Redneck Poker Run just before the Jericho Park trailhead on Route 110. Participants must be out by 1 p.m., and there is a 3 p.m. deadline to be in.
Kinney said the poker run is also open to dirt bikes, motorcycles, trucks, cars, and even bicyclers.
She said there are 12 stops overall and participants must stop at a five to complete their hand.
“There are plenty of stops to choose from to do your hand,” she said. “Anybody can play the Redneck Poker Run.”
Prizes are awarded for the top three hands as well as the worst hand. Participants are also encouraged to incorporate the Redneck theme into their ATV and/or clothing and a prize is awarded to the best use of the theme.
Kinney said local businesses have donated a variety of great prizes including gift certificates, gear bag, flashlights, sweatshirts and dining certificates.
Also on Saturday, there will be an off-road swap meet at 218 Jericho Road from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., hosted by the Androscoggin Valley ATV Club. Gear and machine parts for snowmobiles, ATVs, UTV, dirt bikes, and Jeeps will be available. Riders can also purchase club memberships and gear and support one of the clubs that help keep the trails maintained.
The chamber will be participating in a grand opening celebration from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Jericho Outdoors on 232 Jericho Road, across from the ATV trail leading into Jericho Park. The ribbon cutting will take place at 11 a.m. for the Arctic Cat dealership.
Along with the slate of events scheduled for the summer, Kinney said the chamber has developed an interactive game for riders called, “Where’s Wheeler?" During the riding season, sharp-eyed riders may catch a glimpse of the six-foot wooden cutout dressed in his favorite ATV gear throughout the local trails.
“All summer long you’re going to see this guy around,” Kinney said, revealing Wheeler has trouble staying in one place and will move around. He may even at times stop in a restaurant for a bite to eat or a bar for a cold brew.
Riders who see the elusive man are urged to take a selfie with him and post it on the chamber’s Jericho ATV Festival Facebook page with the hashtag #whereswheeler. Hints to his whereabouts will be posted on the page weekly. There will be monthly drawings picked randomly from those who posted pictures that month.
The hundreds of miles of riding trails coupled with the slate of events are aimed at attracting riders from across New England and the country to the valley. Both Berlin and Gorham allow ATVs on municipal roads so they can access local businesses and restaurants. Bergeron and Kinney both stress the increase in tourists as a result of the ATV trail network is helping the region rebuild its economy after the loss of most of its manufacturing base.
The Bureau of Trail’s website (nhtrails.org) provides weekly updates on trail conditions.

Ham Foundation's grant will put Mountain Top 'over the top' in fundraising campaign

PHOTO:Majestic group inside

CAPTION: Front, from left: Laura Riggs-Mitchell, Nancy Devine, Judy Kennedy. Back, from left: Bill Lord, Jon Goodwin, Frank Benesh, Les Schoof, Ray Mitchell, Dave Mason and George Wiese inside the Majestic. (JAMIE GEMMITI PHOTO)

By Alec Kerr
CONWAY — The Ham Charitable Foundation has thrown down the gauntlet.
The Mountain Top Music Center is two years into a fundraising campaign to renovate the historic Bolduc Block and Majestic Theatre in Conway Village, which it purchased in April 2015.
The project's goal is to raise $2.845 million. Mountain Top is currently at $1.7 million.
According to Mountain Top Executive Director George Wiese, "The Ham Foundation said, 'OK, we will represent the last $500,000 of that (goal) provided that Mountain Top reaches $2.345 million."
"That's our challenge from the Ham Foundation. They said, 'We'll kick you over the top.'
"That leaves Mountain Top, a community music school located in Conway Village that serves more than 350 people through lessons, classes, workshops and community ensembles each year, with about $600,000 to raise.
The ultimate goal is to build classroom space in the Bolduc Block; restore the theater, which was gutted by a fire in 2005; and renovate the storefronts along Main Street for commercial rental.
"Historically, on large projects, the Ham Foundation tries to push organizations over the goal line with challenge grants," said Ham Foundation Executive Director Bob Murphy.
Founded in 1994 to continue the philanthropic efforts of Kendal C. and Anna Ham, the foundation awards money to organization that will improve the quality of life for people living in the Mount Washington Valley and Bridgton and Fryeburg, Maine, communities. The foundation has offered challenge grants to such successful projects as the Ham Arena, North Conway Community Center and the Fryeburg Recreation building, which is currently being constructed.
"The easiest part of fundraising is the initial phase of the fundraising because people are excited and they are willing to jump in," Murphy said. "The hardest part is that last mile — getting over the goal line and being successful, and that's the part the Ham Foundation generally plays in a grant request of this magnitude."
Murphy said he and the foundation are "delighted" to throw their support to Mountain Top because of the organization's far-reaching influence as a music school.
"They are serving children and adults as far away as Bridgton, Maine, Fryeburg, the entire Mount Washington Valley," Murphy said. "It just so happens that it is in Conway Village."
The Mountain Top project, which is due to start construction in late summer/early fall, would encompass constructing a new back entrance to the building and making the upstairs handicap-accessible.
"There are a lot of cautionary tales about non-profits that have started a big project before they really had the fundraising finished, so what the Ham Foundation has done is they have challenged us essentially to ensure that doesn't happen," Wiese said of the grant, which was successfully secured by Mountain Top's Board Chair Laura Riggs-Mitchell.
The fundraising process is set to include numerous special events, performances, dine-to-donate opportunities at local restaurants and large grants, which Wiese is confident they can secure now that they have the promise of the Ham Foundation award.
"The hope from us and the Ham Foundation is that this award will really act as leverage for people who maybe have been on the fence about supporting the project or people who knew they would support the project but weren't sure at what level," Wiese said. "This challenge being on the table can really help us convert enthusiasm not just into dollars but the dollars that we need."
Murphy has been impressed with Wiese's leadership skills and believes he can help carry the organization through to its goal.
"I think the proof is in the puddling," Murphy said. "From the inception of Mountain Top Music to where they are now is a very impressive story, and George has played a vital role in the success of the organization. He is the person that holds the whole thing together and makes it happen."
More good news: The same day that Mountain Top received the letter from the Ham Foundation, it sold the last of the $350,000 tax credits it received from the Community Development Finance Authority last year.
Those credits were sold to local businesses that wanted the opportunity to see their tax money stay local and help a project in need. The Bank of New Hampshire purchased the last tax credit.
"We had great feedback from businesses," Wiese said. "There was a lot of support."
Selling the tax credits was a complicated process, but Mountain Top was aided by Tom Roberts at Leone, McDonnell & Roberts, the North Conway certified public accountant firm. Roberts not only helped explain the process but also helped match up businesses that could benefit from the tax credits with the project.
Following the success of a similar event last November, Mountain Top is also planning another gala at Bretton Woods. The event will be a lunch buffet on Sunday, Sept. 24, featuring the baroque group Sarasa, as well as dancers who will dress in period costumes and perform period dances.
Mountain Top also continues to regularly present performances, including home concerts and First Friday events in the Bolduc building.
"One of the absolute best ways to support this project is to attend Mountain Top's regular events," Wiese said. "Because it is extremely important that we are able to build those things. We are really working hard, especially on the performance side of things, to do a little bit more because we will have more space to do that, so we are really building those programs simultaneously to this project."
It is that very quality that drew the Ham Foundation to the project in the first place.
"We see this as an absolute anchor to the revitalization of Conway Village, and drawing people to the new theater and the many events they have potential of holding there," Murphy said.
"It would be very, very nice to see the lights lit up in Conway Village and people streaming in there to performances as well as rehearsals and functions that could be held in that building. It is a big project with big, big rewards if it is successful."
For more information, visit www.mountaintopmusic.org.